Archive for the ‘American Heart Association CPR’ Category

Are you a Nanny? Looking for the right CPR/First Aid class?

If you are thinking about becoming a nanny and working in Marin County. The American Heart Association CPR and First-aid Training is the right class for you.  Do not start taking care of children until you have completed a CPR and First-aid training class in Marin. The Marin County American Heart Association provides official CPR and First-aid classes for nannies. You must be 10 years old or older in order to attend these training classes.

CPR Classes for Marin Nannies

First-aid Classes for Marin Nannies

 Combined CPR/First-aid class for Marin Nannies

Don’t forget to check in on Facebook on day of your class to get your Free Key Chain Mask!

https://www.facebook.com/Marincountycprclasses

CPR Certification

 

Marin County CPR Classes
Novato Oaks Inn
215 Alameda del Prado
Novato, CA 94949

Phone: (707) 595-2528

www.novatocprclasses.com

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

American Heart Association Pediatric CPR/First Aid Class approved by EMSA

We offer Pediatric CPR and First Aid Classes in the Bay Area. If you are a child care provider, you should take this class. This class is approved by EMSA certification as part of Title 22/AB243 Child Care Laws.

This course combines both CPR and First-aid and students learn how to use an epi pen, bandaging, glove removal, splinting, and how to conduct an interview of an injured victim. Other topics include: bee stings, allergic reactions, snake bites, shock, amputations, seizures, asthma, CPR for all ages, chokesaving, and how to use an AED (defibrillator). CPR Certification Classes in Vallejo

If you will like to take this class or want more information, please visit our website: http://www.cprcpr.com/course-catalog/emsa-pediatric-first-aid-class-for-childcare-providers/

 

Berkeley CPR Classes
Raj Properties – in the courtyard
Next to Asha Tea House
2076 University Avenue, Suite B
Berkeley, CA 94704
Phone: (510) 225-6216
www.berkeleycprclasses.com

 

Heartsaver CPR/AED Class

The American Heart Association Heartsaver CPR/AED certification class covers CPR for infants, children, & adults, choke-saving, and how to use an AED (automated external defibrillator).

Date: Wednesday January 8th, 2014

Time: 1pm to 4pm

Cost: $70

To register for this class, please go to the following link: https://www.novatocprclasses.com/schedule/aha-cpraed/

We do not have a cancellation fee, you only pay if you come to class!!!

 

For more information, please visit our website for more information: https://www.novatocprclasses.com/schedule/aha-cpraed/

Marin County CPR Classes
Novato Oaks Inn
215 Alameda del Prado
Novato, CA 94949
Phone: (707) 595-2528
www.novatocprclasses.com

Marin County, CA American Heart Association CPR/First Aid classes

Course name: Heartsaver First-aid/CPR/AED
Course length: 5 hours
Class price: $140 (cash or check, no credit cards)
Card: Valid for 2 years, receive card on same day

CPR Classes in Mill Valley

We are an American Heart Association Training Center. For more information please click on the following link: https://www.novatocprclasses.com/schedule/aha-cpraedfirst-aid/

 

 

If you don’t find the right time or date, we also have locations in Berkeley, San Francisco, Redwood city, Concord.

 

Marin County CPR Classes
Novato Oaks Inn
215 Alameda del Prado
Novato, CA 94949
Phone: (707) 595-2528
www.novatocprclasses.com

Rohnert Park, CA American Heart Association CPR classes

When: Sunday November 17, 2013

Time: From 1pm to 4pm

Cost: $70

Card: Valid for 2 years

American Heart Association CPR class

This is an American Heart Association Heartsaver CPR course, which covers adult, child and infant CPR, choke-saving and how to use the AED (Automated External Defibrillator). You should take this class is you are a teacher, summer camp counselor, coach, fitness instructor for ACE exams, foster care, social worker, maritime (US Coast Guard approved) nanny, parent, babysitter (ten years or older), construction workers, & general workplace. If you are in the medical Field please do not take this class, you should take the BLS for Healthcare Providers, you can go to our website for more information: https://www.novatocprclasses.com

Marin County CPR Classes
Novato Oaks Inn
215 Alameda del Prado
Novato, CA 94949
Phone: (707) 595-2528
www.novatocprclasses.com

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Petaluma, CPR American Heart Association CPR/AED/First Aid classes

When: Saturday November 9th, 2013

Time: From 1pm to 6pm

Cost: $140

Children-Cpr-Novato

This course is for renewing, re-certification or initial students. You will receive your American Heart Association certificate card at the end of the class. Your certificate is valid for 2 years! Click on our link for more information: https://www.novatocprclasses.com/schedule/aha-cpraedfirst-aid/

 

Marin County CPR Classes
Novato Oaks Inn
215 Alameda del Prado
Novato, CA 94949
Phone: (707) 595-2528
www.novatocprclasses.com

Lots of Free Parking
Distance from San Rafael: 10 miles
Distance from Petaluma: 9 miles
Distance from Mill Valley: 16 miles

San Rafael, CA American Heart Association CPR classes

Date: November 9th, 2013

Time: From 1:00pm to 4:00pm

Cost: $70

CPR Class San Rafael

This is an American Heart Association CPR class that covers adult, child and infant CPR, choke-saving and the use of AED (Automated External Defibrillator). You can take this class if you are renewing or taking it for the first time. Click on our link for more information: https://www.novatocprclasses.com/schedule/aha-cpraed/

 

Marin County CPR Classes
Novato Oaks Inn
215 Alameda del Prado
Novato, CA 94949
Phone: (707) 595-2528
www.novatocprclasses.com
Free Parking!

 

 

 

 

 

As the results of ongoing scientific research continue to emerge, knowledge of health and medicine rapidly expands.  For the American Heart Association, this means constant revision of recommendations for appropriate treatment of cardiac arrest, otherwise known as cardiopulmonary resuscitation, or CPR.  Research done throughout the past decade has led to a number of significant changes over the last few years in the AHA’s guidelines for CPR and have been adapted in the CPR Classes in Marin.  An awareness and understanding of these changes is critical for those who participate in emergency medical care, as well as for those who facilitate the education of caregivers.


Perhaps the most notable of the AHA’s altered recommendations switching from use of the acronym ABC, for Airway first, Breathing second, and Chest Compressions third, to CAB, or Chest Compressions first, Airway second, and Breathing third.  This change is based on research that has determined chest compressions to be the most critical aspect of initial basic life support, or BLS.  While maintaining an open, clear airway and assessing a patient’s respiratory status remain vital steps in resuscitative efforts, it is now believed that the inevitable delay in providing chest compressions brought about by adhering to the ABC format may result in a lower survival rate for victims of cardiac arrest.
Another reason behind prioritizing chest compressions is that researchers believe this approach will encourage more bystanders to attempt CPR.  Laypersons are often hesitant to engage in resuscitation efforts because they feel unprepared to offer adequate rescue breathing, which, in the ABC directive, comes before compressions.  When the heart fails, there is usually enough oxygen in the bloodstream to support the brain for several minutes, as long the blood is circulating.  This underlies the second major change in the AHA’s CPR guidelines dating from 2010, which emphasizes that untrained rescuers engage in Hands-Only CPR, which is taught in CPR Renewal Classes at STS of Marin.  In addition to being equally effective in terms of survival rates, Hands-Only CPR (which consists solely of chest compressions) has been shown to be more easily guided by emergency dispatchers via telephone.
Other significant changes deal with the rate and depth of chest compressions.  Prior to the revised guidelines first published in 2010, a rate of about 100 compressions per minute was recommended, in contrast to the current recommendation of at least 100 per minute.  Similarly, the previous recommended depth of compressions was one and a half to two inches, whereas current guidelines advise a depth of at least two inches.   Respectively, these changes have been made for the purposes of providing a higher number of compressions, which is associated with higher survival rates, and for minimizing the possibility of confusion, which may occur when a range of depth is recommended.
Although the 2010 revised AHA guidelines contain additional changes, the ones covered in this article are the most relevant to educators, emergency medical providers, and laypersons alike.  By understanding and adhering to these alterations and taking a CPR Class at STS in Novato, CA, both trained and untrained rescuers will enhance their ability to provide effective emergency care in the case of cardiac arrest, whether to patients within treatment facilities, family members within the home, or strangers in public.

Cardiopulmonary resuscitation, CPR, was developed in a three-part process which began with mouth-to-mouth resuscitation. Otherwise known as expired air resuscitation (EAR), expired air ventilation (EAV), and more colloquially as rescue breathing or the kiss of death, mouth-to-mouth resuscitation with the addition of chest compressions was first developed in 1956 by Dr. Peter Safar and Dr. James Elam.

 

   The American Heart Association’s website lists, in chronological order, the major achievements in the history of the development of cardiopulmonary resuscitation. The website states that, in 1954,  “James Elam is the first to prove that expired air was sufficient to maintain adequate oxygenation” (AHA.org). Elam’s discovery was prompted by his work with paralyzed polio patients and was the first step in the development of the technique of CPR as it is known today.

 

   The second step in the process occurred in 1956, when “Peter Safar and James Elam invented mouth-to-mouth resuscitation” (AHA.org). This advancement was the result of a collaboration between Safar and Elam on a volunteer study which took place in Baltimore, Maryland. During this volunteer study, the technique of tilting a person’s head backwards to allow a more direct passageway for air to enter into the lungs was perfected. Chest compressions were also introduced in an effort to maintain blood flow to the brain. The combination of these two techniques, mouth-to-mouth resuscitation and chest compressions, created a more complete form of cardiopulmonary resuscitation. Not only could administers get air to the lungs; they had also found a way to keep blood flowing to the brain.

 

   The American Heart Association recognized this form of CPR in 1960. With national recognition from a major organization having been thus achieved, Safar and Elam could now effectively promote the lifesaving technique they had been able to perfect. Theory quickly transformed into practice, and both Safar and Elam dedicated their time to teaching other physicians how to, literally, save a life.

 

   Through the American Heart Association, a major education campaign to raise national awareness and to encourage all types of medical personnel to learn cardiopulmonary resuscitation began. The United States military showed its support for CPR by implementing the practice almost immediately. Various other institutions and organizations followed suit, and cardiopulmonary resuscitation soon became standard protocol for quickly assessing victims in emergency field situations.

 

   Today, CPR is not only relegated for use by medical or military personnel. Some institutions of higher learning, like Safety Training Seminars of Marin, also offer a course or series of courses on CPR and first-aid. It is also not uncommon for those who are affiliated with recreational sports to have received some kind of CPR certification course. Lifeguards, for example, are highly encouraged, and sometimes even required, to have completed CPR certification as a condition of employment and STS of Marin offers all the CPR and First-Aid classes Lifeguards need.

 

   Through the consistent efforts of two doctors, and with the support of nationally recognized organizations such as the American Heart Association, cardiopulmonary resuscitation has evolved from a mere theory into a three-part process of transition which finally culminated in the accepted and widely used practice for sustaining life in emergency situations.

CPR Training Classes in Novato

Saturday , 09/29/2012 at 9:00 am

Saturday , 10/06/2012 at 1:00 pm

Sunday , 10/14/2012 at 1:00 pm

Upcoming CPR classes in Novato